Dyslipidaemia tied to paediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

  • Dowla S & al.
  • J Clin Lipidol
  • 3 Apr 2018

  • from Sarfaroj Khan
  • Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • In children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), prevalence of cardiometabolic derangements, especially dyslipidaemia, was found to be high and it differed based on race or ethnicity.
  • Serum triglycerides (TGs) and non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) may play an important role in the pathophysiology of paediatric NAFLD.

Why this matters

  • NAFLD has emerged as the most common cause of paediatric chronic liver disorder; however, there is no clarity on factors underlying the pathophysiology of NAFLD.

Study design

  • Cross-sectional review of electronic medical records of 309 children (white, n=195; Hispanic, n=71; black, n=43) with a diagnosis of NAFLD.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Overall, 208 children had radiological or histological evidence of NAFLD, and 101 had elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels.
  • Hispanic children were diagnosed with NAFLD at a significantly younger age (10.6±3.1 years; P<.0001) and lower BMI (31.5±6.8 kg/m2; P<.0001) than their white and black counterparts.
  • For the entire cohort, elevated systolic hypertension was seen in 41%, diabetes in 14%, elevated cholesterol in 42%, elevated non–HDL-C in 58%, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in 36%, elevated TG in 88% and elevated low HDL-C in 77%.
  • Significant positive correlation was seen between serum ALT and non–HDL-C (r, 0.16; P=.02) and total TG (r=0.18; P=.01).

Limitations

  • Retrospective study design.