Dysphagia is linked to mortality risk among lung cancer patients

  • Marmor S & al.
  • J Geriatr Oncol
  • 10 Mar 2020

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Dysphagia is associated with significantly higher mortality risk among patients with lung cancer.
  • Dysphagia was present at lung cancer diagnosis in 4% of patients in this study.
  • It was more common in patients who had SCLC, were aged ≥75 years, were black or from rural areas, and had comorbidities or metastasis.

Why this matters

  • Although dysphagia has been reported in as many as 68% of previous lung cancer studies, its effect on patients with lung cancer is largely unknown.

Study design

  • 201,674 patients with lung cancer.
  • Funding: National Institutes of Health.

Key results

  • 61% had NSCLC, 14% SCLC, and 25% unspecified.
  • 4% had dysphagia before lung cancer diagnosis.
  • Dysphagia was more likely (ORs) for:
    • Age 75-79 years: 1.16 (P.001).
    • Age 80-84 years: 1.29 (P<.0001>
    • Age ≥85 years: 1.44 (P<.0001>
    • Black patients: 1.21 (P<.0004>
    • Rural patients: 1.27 (P<.0001>
    • With Charlson comorbidity score 1: 1.36 (P<.0001>
    • With Charlson comorbidity score ≥2: 1.56 (P<.0001>
    • Regional metastasis: 1.60 (P<.0001>
    • Distant metastasis: 1.64 (P<.0001>
    • SCLC: 1.32 (P<.0001>
  • After multivariable analysis, patients with dysphagia had significantly higher risk for death than those without dysphagia: adjusted HR, 1.34 (P≤.0001).

Limitations

  • Retrospective study.