Early breast cancer: how common is return to work?

  • Dumas A & al.
  • J Clin Oncol
  • 13 Dec 2019

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • 2 years after diagnosis, 79% of patients with early breast cancer (eBCa) return to work.
  • Not returning to work was associated with trastuzumab-containing systemic therapies, serious physical adverse events, severe arm morbidity, and psychiatric illness.

Why this matters

  • Patients with breast cancer will want to know the likelihood of failure to return to work and why.

Study design

  • French multicenter prospective cohort study (CANTO) of 1874 women who were working and who were 5 or more years from retirement (≤57 years).
  • The primary outcome was nonreturn to work (non-RTW) 2 years after diagnosis.
  • Funding: French Foundation for Cancer; French National Research Agency; others.

Key results

  • 21.3% of patients were non-RTW at 2 years postdiagnosis.
  • Higher odds of non-RTW were associated with:
    • Combined chemotherapy-trastuzumab (vs chemotherapy-hormonotherapy): aOR, 2.01 (95% CI, 1.18-3.44).
    • Combined chemotherapy-trastuzumab-hormonotherapy (vs chemotherapy-hormonotherapy): aOR, 1.62 (95% CI, 1.10-2.41).
    • At least 1 grade ≥3 physical Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events (physical CTCAE vs none): aOR, 1.59 (95% CI, 1.15-2.18).
    • Severe arm morbidity (vs none): aOR, 1.59 (95% CI, 1.19-2.13).
    • Anxiety (vs none): aOR, 1.47 (95% CI, 1.02-2.11).
    • Depression (vs none): aOR, 2.29 (95% CI, 1.34-3.91).

Limitations

  • Observational design.