Early breast cancer: premenopausal patients at greatest risk for weight gain

  • Breast Cancer Res Treat

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Premenopausal patients with early breast cancer are at greatest risk of gaining >2 kg from diagnosis to 2 years postprimary systemic adjuvant treatment.

Why this matters

  • Premenopausal patients should be considered for diet and exercise counseling to avoid weight gain.

Study design

  • Single-institution cohort of newly diagnosed patients with early breast cancer (n=625).
  • Patients were followed by retrospective chart review from diagnosis to 2 years after completion of their primary treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, radiation).
  • Funding: Breast Cancer Research Foundation; others.

Key results

  • 37% were premenopausal at diagnosis; 29% were non-white.
  • At diagnosis, 33% had normal BMI (BMI, 18 to 2), 27% were overweight (BMI, 25 to 2), and 40% were obese (BMI, ≥30 kg/m2).
  • At 2 years, 31% had lost >2 kg, 34% had stable weight ±2 kg, and 35% had gained >2 kg.
  • Univariate analysis: >2 kg weight gain was more likely in these groups of patients:
    • Premenopausal vs postmenopausal: HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.34-2.04.
    • Receipt of any chemotherapy vs no chemotherapy: HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.04-1.77.
    • Receipt of anthracycline-based chemotherapy+endocrine therapy (ET) vs nonathracycline-based chemotherapy+ET: HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.01-2.54.
  • In multivariate analysis, only premenopausal status was related to weight gain (data not given).

Limitations

  • Single-center study.
  • Retrospective observational design.
  • Reliance on chart.