Early ovarian cancer: fertility sparing and radical surgery yield similar outcomes

  • Bogani G & al.
  • Int J Gynaecol Obstet
  • 16 May 2020

  • curated by Deepa Koli
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Early-stage ovarian cancer has a good prognosis.
  • Conservative vs radical surgery shows no significant survival difference.
  • High-risk disease has worse prognosis irrespective of surgery type.

Why this matters

  • Young women with early-stage disease who want to preserve their fertility can be offered conservative surgery.

Study design

  • Study of 182 women with early-stage ovarian cancer who underwent radical (n=148) or conservative (n=34) procedures.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Median follow-up duration was 175 months.
  • 10-year DFS, OS, and cancer-specific survival, respectively:
    • Total group: 82.9%, 87.9%, and 92.8%.
    • Conservative surgery: 79.4%, 94.1%, and 94.1%.
    • Radical surgery: 83.7%, 86.4%, and 92.5%.
  • Women undergoing conservative vs radical treatment had similar DFS (P=.783) and OS (P=.334).
  • In propensity-score matched analysis, no difference was observed in 10-year DFS (P=.663) and OS (P=.542) between treatments.
  • Women with high risk vs low risk had worse OS (P=.007).
  • Both approaches were associated with similar DFS (P=.121) and OS (P=.781).

Limitations

  • Single-center, retrospective.