EASD 2018—Population-based screening improves long-term glycemic control in Dutch study


  • Robert Davies and Harry O'Connor
  • Conference Reports
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Takeaway

  • Population-based screening for type 2 diabetes (T2D) is linked with better long-term glycemic control and a lower requirement for insulin compared with opportunistic screening (standard care) in a Dutch setting.

Why this matters

  • Freeing up insulin use in some patients with T2D may increase availability for those with a greater insulin need.

 Study design

  • 3 Dutch cohorts were included: 391 patients with a 10-year T2D duration who were screen-detected compared with 4473 patients with T2D duration of 7 years and 2660 patients with T2D duration of 10 years following opportunistic screening.
  • Insulin prescription and HbA1c levels were compared between cohorts after adjustment for demographic variables.
  • Funding: University Medical Center Utrecht.

Key results

  • Insulin prescription in the screen detection cohort was 10.5% compared with 14.7% in the 7 years and 18.9% in the 10 years opportunistic screening groups, respectively.
  • Opportunistic screening diagnosis at 7- and 10-year T2D duration had 1.5 and 1.9 higher adjusted odds for insulin prescription than those with a screen-detected diagnosis at 10 years T2D duration.
  • HbA1c levels in the opportunistic screening 7- and 10-year duration groups were on average 1.6 mmol/mol higher than those with screen-detected 10 years T2D duration.

Limitations

  • Disproportionate sample size between screen-detected and standard care cohorts.
  • Only tested in a Dutch setting.

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