Emotional and psychological support for diabetics in the UK is inadequate

  • Diabetes UK
  • 14 May 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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A new survey by Diabetes UK indicates that seven out of 10 individuals in the UK feel overwhelmed by the challenges of living with diabetes.

The survey collected insights from individuals affected by diabetes as well as healthcare professionals treating the condition. More than 2000 adults across the UK living with diabetes participated in the survey.

Living with diabetes can have a substantial impact on the patients' emotional, mental and psychological wellbeing and health. According to the survey, 75 per cent of individuals who were overwhelmed said it affected their efficiency of managing the condition. The findings also showed that three-quarters of individuals with diabetes requiring mental health support were unable to access it. Seventy per cent of individuals with diabetes also reported difficulties in discussing their emotional wellbeing with their diabetes teams.

Among general practitioners (GPs) that were surveyed, 40 per cent were not likely to inquire about the emotional wellbeing and mental health of their patients during routine appointments. Thirty per cent of GPs said that the emotional and psychological support available for patients was adequate.

Chris Askew, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK said: "Diabetes services that include emotional and psychological support can help people improve both their physical and mental health, reduce pressure on services, and save money."