ENDO 2019—CPAP treatment for OSA linked to greater absolute weight loss


  • Tara Haelle
  • Conference Reports
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Takeaway

  • Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was associated with significantly greater absolute—but not percentage—weight loss than no OSA treatment in a calorie restriction and exercise program.

Why this matters

  • Untreated OSA and obesity are associated with mortality and severe morbidity, but CPAP compliance rates are low.

Study design

  • Retrospective study involving 300 adults (78.7% female), aged 18-65 with a BMI ≥30 and
  • Program included exercise, weekly counseling, and cognitive behavioral therapy.
  • 3 groups included asymptomatic OSA (OSA-A, n=89), symptomatic OSA (OSA-S, n=164), and OSA with CPAP treatment (OSA-T, n=47). 

Key results

  • Greater absolute weight loss in OSA-T group (−12.1 kg) than OSA-S (−9.5 kg) or OSA-A (-8.7 kg) groups (P<.01>
  • OSA-T weight loss percentage (−10.46%) did not significantly exceed OSA-A (−9.14%) or OSA-S (−8.47%) groups (P=.065).
  • CPAP treatment was associated with absolute weight loss (Spearman’s correlation coefficient, −0.181; P=.013) after baseline BMI, age, and gender correction. 

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