Endocrine Society calls for revised strategy on endocrine disrupting chemicals


  • Mary Corcoran
  • International Medical News
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The Endocrine Society has voiced concern that the European Union’s (EU’s) criteria for regulating endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in pesticides and biocides do not go far enough to protect public health.

The statement comes as the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) and the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) publish their guidance on how to identify substances with endocrine disrupting properties in pesticides and biocides. The guidance for the assessment of biocides came into effect this month. It will be used in the assessment of pesticides for which a decision is scheduled on or after 10 November 2018.

The Endocrine Society says it is concerned that the final criteria require "an excessively high level of proof that a chemical is an endocrine disruptor, and that the guidance document creates further unnecessary barriers to regulating harmful EDCs". It maintains the finding of an adverse effect that involves hormones or endocrine systems should be sufficient to identify an EDC. 

The Society is calling for the EU to revise its 1999 strategy on EDCs to account for new scientific information developed in recent years, with the aim of minimising exposure to hazardous EDCs throughout the environment and in consumer products.