England’s health inequality gap is widening: PHE report

  • Public Health England
  • 3 Mar 2020

  • curated by Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Medical News
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Public Health England (PHE) has published official statistics which show that the gap in life expectancy between the most and least deprived areas of England has significantly widened to 9.5 years for males and 7.5 years for females between the periods 2011-2013 and 2016-2018.

The average life expectancy for males and females living in the most deprived areas is 73.9 and 78.6 years, respectively, whereas in the least deprived areas, it is 83.4 years for males and 86.3 years for females.

Between 2016 and 2018, people in the most deprived areas were four times more likely to die prematurely from cardiovascular diseases and twice as likely to die from cancer.

The infant mortality rate and suicide rate in the most deprived areas of England were both double that in the least deprived areas in 2016-2018, and this inequality has not changed significantly since 2011-2013.

Blackpool had the lowest life expectancy at birth for both males and females in 2016-2018, at 74.5 and 79.5 years, respectively. Current life expectancy estimates in Blackpool are equivalent to the average life expectancy seen in 1996 for males and 1995 for females.

Eight local authorities had male life expectancy estimates which were significantly lower than the average 15 years ago. For females, this figure was 11.