Estimated 92% of cancers caused by HPV could be prevented by vaccine - CDC study

  • Senkomago V, et al.
  • United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • 23 Aug 2019

  • curated by Priscilla Lynch
  • Univadis
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The vast majority of HPV-related cancers could be prevented by appropriate vaccination with the 9-valent HPV vaccine, according to the findings of a new study in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), published by the United States (US) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

CDC researchers analysed 2012–2016 data from the CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program to determine the incidence of HPV-associated cancers, and to estimate the annual number of cancers attributable to the HPV types in the currently available HPV vaccine.

During the period studied, an average of 34,800 HPV-attributable cancers were diagnosed each year. Of these, 32,100 (92%) cancers were attributable to HPV types targeted by the 9-valent HPV vaccine (9vHPV), with a 59/41 per cent female/male ratio.

The most common HPV-attributable cancers reported during the study period were cervical (9,700) and oropharyngeal (12,600).

Additional data published in the MMWR show that HPV vaccination rates were higher in adolescents whose parents reported receiving a recommendation from their child’s healthcare professional. Overall, just 51 per cent of all US teens (13-17 years) had received all recommended doses of the HPV vaccine in 2018, a two percentage point increase from 2017.