False-positive mammogram tied to 12-year breast cancer risk

  • Román M & al.
  • Br J Cancer
  • 19 Dec 2018

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • False-positive results on mammographic screen are associated with elevated risk of screen-detected and interval breast cancers for 12 years.
  • A second false-positive result is associated with even higher risk of screen-detected and interval breast cancers.

Why this matters

  • Women with false-positive results may warrant more vigilant surveillance for breast cancer.

Study design

  • Population-based study of cohorts (age, 50-69 years) from 3 countries (Denmark, Norway, and Spain) (n=1,149,467 baseline screenings).
  • False-positive screen is recall for further assessment after an abnormal screen without confirmation of breast cancer diagnosis.
  • Screen-detected breast cancer is diagnosis at further assessment of an abnormal screen.
  • Interval breast cancer is diagnosis after a negative screen or false-positive screen before the next screening (2 years).
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Average follow-up for screen-detected cancers was 5.6 years; interval cancer was 6.3 years.
  • A false-positive result (vs negative result) was associated with a 2-fold higher risk of screen-detected (HR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.93-2.16) and interval breast cancer (HR, 2.18; 95% CI, 2.02-2.34).
  • Second false-positive result (vs negative results) was associated with a 4-fold higher risk of screen-detected (HR, 4.71; 95% CI, 3.81-5.83) and interval breast cancer (HR, 4.22; 95% CI, 3.27-5.46).
  • Breast cancer risk after the first or second false-positive was elevated for 12 years after baseline screen.

Limitations

  • Observational design.