Family history of autoimmune disorders tied to ADHD risk

  • Li X & al.
  • Psychiatr Genet
  • 6 Nov 2018

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Autoimmune disease of any type in first-degree family members (parents/siblings) is tied to an 11% increased risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Why this matters

  • Clinicians should be alert to the association between familial autoimmune disease and ADHD.

Study design

  • Population-wide cohort (n=8,109,198), using the Multigeneration Register in Sweden and other population-wide databases.
  • Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated as relative risks for ADHD in family members with vs without autoimmune disease.
  • Funding: Crafoordska stiftelsen; Swedish Research Council; others.

Key results

  • The incidence of ADHD was increased by 11% when a first-degree relative was diagnosed with any of 42 autoimmune diseases (SIR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.10-1.13).
  • More specifically, the following 14 autoimmune diseases were associated with increased ADHD risk:
    • ankylosing spondylitis (SIR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.03-1.24),
    • celiac disease (SIR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.10-1.23),
    • Crohn's disease (SIR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01-1.14),
    • type 1 diabetes (SIR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.12-1.26),
    • discoid lupus erythematosus (SIR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.03-1.53),
    • glomerular nephritis chronic (SIR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.01-1.26),
    • Hashimoto/hyperthyroidism (SIR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.05-1.17),
    • lupoid hepatitis (SIR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.24-1.65),
    • multiple sclerosis (SIR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.03-1.19),
    • psoriasis (SIR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.15-1.22),
    • Reiter's disease (SIR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.02-1.83),
    • rheumatoid arthritis (SIR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.12),
    • Sjogren's syndrome (SIR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.07-1.37), and
    • ulcerative colitis (SIR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.00-1.10).

Limitations

  • Observational design.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit