Fatty liver tied to higher odds of diverticulosis

  • Bae HJ & al.
  • Korean J Gastroenterol
  • 25 Sep 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Asymptomatic colonic diverticulosis is more likely in patients with moderate or severe fatty liver.
  • Waist-hip ratio is also a factor.

Why this matters

  • Knowing the risk factors for asymptomatic diverticulosis could help prevent complications, such as diverticular bleeding and diverticulitis, that affect up to 30% of the patients with the disease.

Study design

  • Researchers analysed the health records of patients screened for diverticulosis during colonoscopy (N=937), comparing them by screening results for associations such as age, sex, alcohol use, smoking status, lipid profile, BMI, visceral fat area, waist-hip ratio, and fatty liver.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Overall diverticulosis prevalence was 8.1% (76/937).
  • Mean waist-hip ratio was 0.92±0.05 in patients with diverticulosis vs 0.90±0.05 in those without (P=.052).
  • Fatty liver was found in 69.7% (53/76) of the patients with diverticulosis vs 50.3% (433/861) of those without (P=.001).
  • Multivariate analysis showed that both the factors were associated with increased asymptomatic diverticulosis risk: 
    • Waist-hip ratio: OR, 1.035; P=.043.
    • Moderate fatty liver: OR, 2.238; P=.043.
    • Severe fatty liver: OR, 5.519; P=.025.

Limitations

  • The study was retrospective and single centre, with a small number of patients who were screened positive.
  • Researchers did not control for age or adjust for potential confounding factors such as diet, exercise, and medication.

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