Female GPs earn £40,000 a year less than their male colleagues


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Professional News
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A new report by the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) has revealed that the gender pay gap for GPs now stands at 35 per cent - the fifth largest pay gap of any profession in the UK as a percentage. This gap is also significantly higher than the overall NHS average pay gap of 17 per cent and the mean UK pay gap of 16.2 per cent.

On average a male GP earns an estimated £110,000 a year whilst female GPs earn an estimated £70,000. The figures mean female GPs earn just 65p for every £1 earned by a male GP.

The analysis found that women of every age and on every type of GP contract earn less than their male counterparts.

The report says a number of factors contribute to the pay gap. Among them, it points out that women are more likely to work part-time than men. In addition, almost 80 per cent of male GPs are partners. By contrast fewer than 50 per cent of female GPs are partners.

According to IPPR, these findings put a significant onus on the government to review how women can be better supported in work, and how the current two-tier contract system can be urgently rectified.

The IPPR will be publishing further recommendations on the future of primary care later in the year as part of the IPPR Better Health and Care Programme.