Few adolescents or young men receiving reproductive health services, counseling

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Takeaway

  • Despite CDC and American Academy of Pediatrics family planning and sexual health clinical guidelines, few young men aged 15-24 y overall receive sexual and reproductive healthcare (SRHC) across 4 core services (ie, sexual health assessment/past sexually transmitted disease [STD]/HIV tests/family planning; STD/HIV laboratories; condom supply; and related counseling) or within a subdomain.
  • Data are needed to determine reasons for low services provision rates.

Why this matters

  • Clinicians should use any clinical visit to provide counseling on sexual activity, testing, and services, even to never sexually active (NSA) young male patients.
  • Clinicians treating young male adolescents and adults may wish to offer private time without a parent to provide SRHC.

Key results

  • 427 participants (sexually active [SA], n=385; NSA, n=42) enrolled.
  • 9.4% of SA males received all SRHC services and 7.3% received none (mean SD, 10.69) vs 2.4% received all and 26.2% none among NSA males (mean SD, 4.43) (P<.001>
  • Time alone with provider was significantly associated with receipt of each SRHC subdomain except family planning screening and provision of condoms (P<.01 or p depending on service provided>

Study design

  • Cross-sectional survey analysis of recipients of 18 SRHC services across 4 domains.
  • Funding: CDC; Secretary’s Minority AIDS Initiative.

Limitations

  • Cross-sectional data.
  • Self-report bias.