Food-borne fluoroquinolone resistance is becoming a problem in the EU

  • ECDC
  • EFSA, ECDC
  • 27 Feb 2020

  • curated by Liz Scherer
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • A substantial proportion of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella bacteria is detectable in humans, according to a 2017-2018 ECDC and European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) report on data in humans, animals, and food.
  • Findings highlight increases in high-level ciprofloxacin resistance in Salmonella isolates from 2016 (1.7%) to 2018 (4.6%).

Why this matters

  • The increase in food-borne MDR Salmonella and other isolates highlights the need for enhanced surveillance, screening, and reporting.
  • Clinicians should be vigilant for carbapenem-resistant infections.

Key points

  • The report cites a high proportion of human Salmonella isolate resistance to:
    • Sulfonamides (30.5%), tetracyclines (28.8%), and ampicillin (25.9%). 
    • 12.5% of Salmonella isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin.
    • Extremely high resistance was seen in S. Kentucky (85.7%), while the EU average was 29.6%.
  • Sporadic cases of human carbapenem-resistant Salmonella infections were observed.
  • Low rates of resistance to azithromycin (1.6%) and tigecycline (1.7%) were reported overall.
    • Belgium had the highest rates of both: 4.7% azithromycin and 8.5% tigecycline. 
  • 51.5% of Salmonella spp. from broilers and 42.7% from turkeys were resistant to ciprofloxacin.
  • 48.8% from broilers and 33.7% from turkeys were resistant to nalidixic acid.
  • Escherichia coli susceptibility in food-producing animals increased in ~25% of member states from 2014 to 2018.