Fremanezumab reduces need for acute headache and migraine medication

  • Brandes JL & al.
  • Cephalalgia
  • 21 Nov 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Patients with episodic migraine who received subcutaneous fremanezumab needed acute headache and migraine-specific medication less often than those who received a placebo and reported lower incidences of nausea or vomiting, photophobia, and phonophobia.

Why this matters

  • These findings were observed with both a monthly and quarterly dose regimen.

Study design

  • The phase 3 (HALO) randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolled patients with episodic migraine.
  • Patients received subcutaneous fremanezumab (225 mg monthly, n=290; 675 mg quarterly, n=291) or placebo (n=294) for 12 weeks.
  • Funding: Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., Petach Tikva, Israel.

Key results

  • Treatment with fremanezumab (monthly and quarterly, respectively) vs placebo reduced:
    • number of days of acute headache medication use (least-squares mean [LSM] change, −1.4 and −1.3; Pboth<.001 and>
    • migraine-specific acute headache medication use (LSM change, −2.2 and −2.2; Pboth<.001>
  • Migraine-associated symptoms reduced with fremanezumab (monthly and quarterly, respectively) vs placebo:
    • number of days with nausea/vomiting (difference: −0.7 [P<.001 and>
    • photophobia (difference: −0.9 [P<.001 and>
    • phonophobia (difference: −1.0 [P<.001 and>
  • Rates of severe adverse events (AEs), serious AEs, and AEs leading to discontinuation were similar across treatment groups (≤2%).

Limitations

  • Prespecified exploratory analyses.

Coauthored with Chitra Ravi, MPharm