GI cancer: time to do more in tackling unintentional weight loss?

  • Yoon SL & al.
  • J Cachexia Sarcopenia Muscle
  • 4 Mar 2019

  • curated by David Reilly
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Cachexia is associated with inferior survival in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, particularly in those with upper GI cancers.

Why this matters

  • Half of all cancer deaths worldwide are attributable to cachexia; GI cancers have the highest incidence of cachexia.

Study design

  • Study to investigate changes in body weight in 801 patients with GI cancer.
  • Patient data were sourced from a single institution.
  • 66.5±11.9 (range, 21-95) years mean patient age.
  • Patient BMI at initial observation:
    • 62.0% were BMI high (≥25 kg/m2).
    • 30.1% were BMI normal (20 to 2).
    • 7.8% were BMI low (2).
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Significant interaction between primary cancer site and days of observation (F=8.24; P<.001 with patients colorectal cancer with: style="list-style-type:circle;">
  • gastric cancer lost 0.033 kg more per day (t=−5.11; P<.001>
  • esophageal cancer lost 0.027 kg more per day (t=−4.18; P<.001>
  • pancreatic cancer lost 0.018 kg more per day (t=−3.58; P<.001 and>
  • hepatobiliary cancer lost 0.008 kg more per day (t=−1.90; P=.029).
  • Other significant predictors of weight change:
    • Female sex: F=64.93; P<.001.>
    • Baseline cancer stage: F=7.28; P<.001.>
  • Limitations

    • Retrospective data.

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