Green tea intake tied to lower kidney stone risk

  • Shu X & al.
  • Int J Urol
  • 8 Nov 2018

  • curated by Craig Hicks
  • Clinical Essentials
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Drinking green tea may lower the risk for incident kidney stones, especially among men.

Why this matters

  • "A mainstay of dietary prevention is to increase fluid intake to achieve >2.5 L of urine volume daily," say researchers. "While water intake is generally preferable, other beverage choices might increase or decrease stone risk."

Study design

  • Researchers studied incident kidney stones and tea intake among Chinese men (n=58,054; baseline age, 40-74 years) and women (n=69,166; baseline age, 40-70 years).
  • Funding: NIH.

Key results

  • Incident stones were reported by 1202 men and 1451 women.
  • Green tea drinkers (men, HR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.69-0.88]; women, HR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.74-0.95]) had lower incident stone risk than never or former drinkers.
  • Researchers observed a stronger dose-response trend for the amount of tea consumed per month by men (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.56-0.80; Ptrend<.001 than by women ci p>trend=.041).

Limitations

  • Kidney stone incidence and tea intake were self-reported.
  • Researchers only considered baseline information for most covariates included in their analysis.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit