HCV: baby boomers remain largely untested

  • Kasting ML & al.
  • Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev
  • 27 Mar 2018

  • curated by Yael Waknine
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • HCV screening among baby boomers has increased slightly but remains low overall, according to the latest 2013-2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data.

Why this matters

  • In 2012, the CDC issued a recommendation for universal HCV screening for individuals born 1945-1965.
  • Although 35% of baby boomers had seen a provider in the preceding 12 months, only 12% had received HCV screening, suggesting missed opportunities.

Study design

  • NHIS 2013-2015 data for 88,744 individuals born before 1945 (n=15,100), during 1945-1965 (n=28,725), during 1966-1985 (n=28,089), and after 1985 (n=13,296).
  • Funding: NIH, National Cancer Institute.

Key results

  • Baby boomer screening rate rose from 11.9% in 2013 to 12.8% in 2015. 
  • In multivariate analysis, screening odds rose by 20% from 2013 to 2014 (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.05-1.38), and by 31% from 2014 to 2015 (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.13-1.52).
  • Significant factors for nontesting (P<.05>
  • Increasing age (per 5 years, aOR, 0.90); 
  • Female sex (aOR, 0.71);
  • Black race (aOR, 0.81); and
  • Hispanic ethnicity (aOR, 0.79).
  • Positive factors included ever-testing for HIV (aOR, 4.17) or receipt of preventive services in last year (healthcare visit [aOR, 1.27] or colon cancer screening [aOR, 1.43]).
  • Limitations

    • Not all HCV risk factors addressed in survey; high-risk populations excluded.
    • Self-reported data.

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