HCV in PWID: C-SCOPE underscores need for physician training

  • Grebely J & al.
  • Int J Drug Policy
  • 23 Nov 2018

  • curated by Yael Waknine
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Physicians practicing in opioid agonist treatment (OAT) clinics recognize the importance of HCV testing and treatment for people who inject drugs (PWID), but report poor self-perceived competency for infection management and treatment.

Why this matters

  • Findings highlight a need for improved HCV education and training among drug treatment providers.

Study design

  • 2017 C-SCOPE online survey involving 203 eligible physicians from OAT clinics in Europe (45%), the United States (40%), Canada (8%), and Australia (6%).
  • Competence self-assessed on a 7-point scale (4=average).
  • Funding: MSD.     

Key results

  • Common specialties: psychiatry (29%), addiction medicine and psychiatry (21%, 20%), and general practice/family physician (19%).
  • Mean years in practice, 11; mean PWID managed, 51 (with HCV, 24).
  • Most perceived HCV testing (86%) and treatment (82%) as important.
  • Few reported below-average competency for regular screening (12%) and interpretation (14%).
  • Below-average competency was more commonly reported for:
    • Advising patients on new HCV therapies (27%).
    • Knowledge of new options (36%).
    • HCV treatment/management (40%).
  • In adjusted analysis, factors predictive of average-or-less competency for HCV treatment/management included: fewer years in practice, fewer HCV patients over the last 6 months, not having obtained relevant information, no training in the last year, and not having read or consulted HCV guidelines.

Limitations

  • Potential selection bias.
  • Self-report.