Health disparities among adult patients with familial hypercholesterolemia


  • Atherosclerosis
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By Ruth Frikke-Schmidt, Chief Physician, Clinical Research Associate Professor, MD, DMSc, PhD, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

 

Stephen M. Amrock and and co-workers report in the December 2017 issue of Atherosclerosis that in a contemporary US population of familial hypercholestolemia (FH) patients, there are differences in LDL-cholesterol goal attainment and statin usage after stratifying the population by either sex or race/ethnicity. The first author, Stephen M. Amrock, is from the Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.

 

Background:  Large fractions of FH patients remain undertreated, and it is unclear what role health disparities may play for FH patients in the US. The aim of the present report was to describe sex and racial/ethnic disparities in a national registry of US FH patients.

Results: Data from 3167 adults enrolled in the CAscade SCreening for Awareness and DEtection of Familial Hypercholesterolemia (CASCADE-FH) registry was used to evaluate differences in LDL-cholesterol goals and statin use by gender and racial/ethnic groups. Compared to men, women were 32% less likely to achieve treated LDL-cholesterol of

Conclusion and Discussion: In the national US CASCADE-FH registry, differences in LDL-cholesterol goal attainment and statin usage were observed among genders and racial/ethnic groups. These findings suggest that health disparities contribute to the undertreatment of US FH patients. Increased efforts to raise awareness of these differences are warranted.