High doses of vitamin B6, B12 tied to hip fracture

  • Meyer HE & al.
  • JAMA Netw Open
  • 3 May 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • High consumption (vs low consumption) of vitamins B6 and B12 from food and supplements is associated with increased risk for hip fracture in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS).

Why this matters

  • Clinicians should advise patients that caution should be used in vitamin supplementation when there is no apparent deficiency.

Study design

  • Prospective cohort of 75,864 postmenopausal women in the NHS (1984-2014).
  • Intake of B6 and B12 from food and supplements was based on a Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ).
  • Hip fracture based on self-report.
  • Funding: NIH.

Key results

  • 2304 women had hip fracture during follow-up.
  • The high (vs low) vitamin B6 group (≥35 vs
  • The high (vs low) vitamin B12 group (≥30 vs
  • The group with high (vs low) combined intake of both vitamins (B6 ≥35 mg/day and B12 ≥20 μg/day) had the highest risk for hip fracture (RR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.15-1.89).

Limitations

  • Reliance on FFQ for vitamin exposure.
  • Reliance on self-report for hip fracture.