High hsCRP: a prediagnostic marker for lung cancer?

  • Muller DC & al.
  • BMJ
  • 3 Jan 2019

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentrations were associated with a greater risk for lung cancer in current and former smokers, but not in never smokers.
  • There was no association in adenocarcinoma.

Why this matters

  • Prior studies suggesting an association between CRP and lung cancer risk were underpowered to provide data based on smoking status.
  • Findings suggest hsCRP as a prediagnostic marker of lung cancer, rather than a causal risk factor.

Study design

  • Nested case-control study.
  • Prediagnostic serum or plasma samples from 5299 matched lung cancer case-control pairs in the Lung Cancer Cohort Consortium.
  • Funding: NIH; others.

Key results

  • Median time from blood draw to lung cancer diagnosis was 6.8 years.
  • Overall, 47% were current smokers, 28% former smokers, and 25% never smokers.
  • Higher hsCRP concentration was associated with overall lung cancer (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.03-1.08).
  • Association observed for current (OR for doubling, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.05-1.13) and former (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.04-1.14) smokers, but not never-smokers (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.91-1.00).
  • Association was highest for current/former smokers diagnosed in the first 2 years of follow-up (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.13-1.29).
  • No association in adenocarcinoma (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.91-1.05).

Limitations

  • Single hsCRP measurement.

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