High optimism tied to lower odds of pain after deployment

  • Hassett AL & al.
  • JAMA Netw Open
  • 1 Feb 2019

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Clinical Essentials
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Soldiers who reported high levels of optimism before being deployed to Afghanistan or Iraq were 11% less likely to report new pain postdeployment, even after controlling for potential confounders.
  • After deployment, 37.3% of soldiers reported pain in ≥1 new body part, with back pain and joint pain the most common sites of new pain.

Why this matters

  • 52.1% of soldiers reported high levels of optimism before deployment.
  • Those who reported low levels of optimism predeployment were 35% more likely to report new pain compared with those reporting high levels of optimism predeployment.

Study design

  • 20,734 US Army active duty, Reserve, and National Guard soldiers deployed to Afghanistan/Iraq between February 2010 and August 2014 were evaluated.
  • New reports of pain after deployment were examined.
  • Funding: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Key results

  • Each 1-U increase in optimism was associated with 11% lower odds of any new pain (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.86-0.93).
  • Soldiers with high vs low optimism had 35% greater chances of reporting any new pain (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.21-1.50).
  • Postdeployment, 37.3% of soldiers reported pain in ≥1 new body part:
    • new back pain, joint pain, and frequent headaches were reported by 25.3%, 23.1%, and 12.1% of soldiers, respectively.

Limitations

  • Pain duration, intensity not assessed.

Coauthored with Antara Ghosh, PhD

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit