High statin use linked to decreased lung cancer risk

  • Clin Lung Cancer

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • High statin use was associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer in patients with hypercholesterolemia.
  • Benefit was noted regardless of smoking history but was greatest among current smokers.

Why this matters

  • Studies on the benefit of statins in cancer prevention have produced conflicting results.

Study design

  • 16,588 male patients with hypercholesterolemia from the National Health Insurance Service-National Health Screening Cohort (NHIS-HEALS) in Korea who were high statin users (n=4050), low statin users (n=4050), or nonusers (n=8488).
  • Funding: Yonsei University College of Medicine.

Key results

  • 48.8% of overall cohort used statins.
  • 2.2% of overall cohort diagnosed with lung cancer.
  • Compared with nonusers, high statin use was independently associated with a decreased risk of cancer compared with low statin use (aHRs, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.47-0.85 and 1.03; 95% CI, 0.80-1.33, respectively) after adjustment for confounders.
  • Compared with nonusers, high statin use was also associated with reduced lung cancer risk among a smoking subgroup after adjusting for confounders (aHR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.52-1.31 for nonsmokers; aHR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.27-1.29 for ex-smokers; and aHR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.79 for current smokers).

Limitations

  • Retrospective study with all-male, all-Korean cohort.

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