Higher daily sitting time tied to increased risk for CVD and diabetes

  • Bailey DP & al.
  • Am J Prev Med
  • 1 Aug 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • This meta-analysis suggests that higher levels of total daily sitting time are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, independent of physical activity.

Why this matters

  • Findings support a focus on reducing total daily sitting time in public health guidelines.

Study design

  • 9 studies (n=448,285) that examined the association between total daily sitting time and CVD or diabetes outcomes were identified after a search across electronic databases.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Higher total daily sitting time was associated with a significantly increased risk for CVD (HR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.27-1.30) and diabetes (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.04-1.22; I2, 53%; P<.001 for both when not adjusted physical activity.>
  • After adjustment for physical activity, the risk for diabetes (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.19) and CVD (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.23; P<.001 for both was significantly increased with a higher total daily sitting time.>

Limitations

  • Use of self-report questionnaires to measure exposure.
  • Physical activity was self-reported, and its outcomes were not consistent across studies.