How disability, gender and social environment shape vulnerability to HIV infection in a Burundian population


  • Heather Mason
  • Univadis Medical News
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

A study that examined the vulnerability of people with disability to HIV acquisition showed that women with early disability were highly vulnerable to HIV infection. The findings were published in EClinicalMedicine.

The cross-sectional study conducted in Bujumbura, Burundi analysed 623 individuals with a disability and 609 individuals without disability, matching them for age, sex, and location. Participants were randomly selected to be tested for HIV and to participate in an interview about their life history, their social environment and their knowledge of sexual health.

Some aims of this study were to examine how the interaction among disability, gender and socioeconomic environment shapes vulnerability to HIV and to identify potential pathways to higher HIV risk.

Researchers found that a total of 68% of men and 75% of women with a disability were affected by multidimensional poverty compared with 54% and 46% of their peers without disability (P<.0001 higher hiv prevalence was observed among women with disability especially those restricted support networks. in addition education level and sexual violence mediated of the association between early>

This study highlights how the intersection of disability, gender and social environment shapes vulnerability to HIV.