HPV vaccination: persistence can help overcome parental hesitation

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Takeaway

  • Parental HPV vaccine hesitancy can be reversed by assertive, persistent provider feedback/encouragement.

Why this matters

  • Providers are parents’ preferred source for vaccine information.
  • Using an assertive, persistent style to respectfully engage parents, address questions or concerns, and promote HPV vaccination may reverse hesitancy and increase same-day vaccination.

Key results

  • 43 discussions, 11 providers, 72% parents were Hispanic, 28% African American.
  • Parents expressed vaccine hesitancy in 37/43 visits, 73% (n=27) were refusals or request for delays (e.g., ‘let me think about it’).
  • Parents’ questions focused on safety- or disease-specific concerns.
  • Providers acquiesced in 16% (6) of visits, agreeing to delay vaccination, or agreeing to parents’ choice to accept/refuse.
  • 35% (13) of visits contained a mixture of provider acquiescence and persistence (i.e., probing to understand concerns followed by eventual acquiescence).
  • In 48.6% (18) of visits, providers responded by persistence only.
  • Same-day vaccine uptake was 0% when providers acquiesced, 15.4% (2/13) when provider response was mixed, and 94.4% (17/18) when providers were persistent.

Study design

  • Qualitative cohort analysis to develop typology around patient-provider communication around HPV vaccination hesitancy and patterns of association between communication and same-day vaccination.
  • Funding: None.

Limitations

  • Exploratory.
  • Nongeneralizable.
  • Focus solely on verbal vs nonverbal vaccine hesitancy.