HPV vaccine: strong provider recommendation boosts uptake

  • Dempsey AF & al.
  • Vaccine
  • 4 Feb 2019

  • curated by Liz Scherer
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Presumptive verbal communication paired with strong HPV vaccine recommendations bolster parent uptake decisions.

Why this matters

  • Single out importance of HPV vaccine vs other types.
  • Explain effect of vaccine on future outcomes.
  • Listen carefully to parent questions, ensure overall understanding of safety and efficacy.

Key results

  • Adjusted response rate, 47% (342/723).
  • No vaccine uptake outcomes difference between intervention/control provider arms.
  • 63% (n=104) of parents noting a "very strong" provider vaccine recommendation reported having teenagers vaccinated (P=.003) or intending to (68%, n=36; P=.001) vs other strength recommendations.
    • Receiving a very strong recommendation linked to greater perceived urgency for vaccination, greater trust in information provided, decreased vaccine hesitancy.
  • Receipt of "presumptive style" vaccine recommendation also perceived as "very strong" (58%), associated with fewer concerns about safety (49% vs 67%, not presumptive recommendations; P=.01).
  • 44% reported no longer hesitating about the vaccine (vs 27%; P=.05); 56% (vs 38%) reported having their child vaccinated (P=.01).

Study design

  • Cross-sectional survey of parents of young adolescents evaluating provider HPV communication strategies following a 12-month, randomized communication intervention training.
  • Funding: CDC.

Limitations

  • Inability to measure communication style.
  • Sample bias.
  • Self-report, recall biases.
  • No linkage between individual provider communication/patient visits.
  • Limited assessment criteria.