HRT use is associated with lower lung cancer risk in women

  • Abdel-Rahman O
  • Int J Clin Oncol
  • 9 Jan 2020

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Current use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with a significantly lower risk for lung cancer incidence and disease-specific mortality in women with a history of smoking compared with women who had never used HRT.

Why this matters

  • Protective benefits of HRT may decrease over time following discontinuation of HRT use.

Study design

  • 77,911 women without lung cancer from the National Cancer Institute prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovary trial with a history of prior HRT use (n=50,248) or no HRT use (n=27,663).
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Lung cancer was diagnosed in 2.1% of never HRT users and 1.6% of ever HRT users.
  • HRT ever-users had a significantly lower risk (adjusted HRs) for:
    • Lung cancer: 0.876 (P=.022);
    • Disease-specific mortality: 0.814 (P=.003); and
    • All-cause mortality: 0.813 (P<.001>
  • Among ever-smokers, HRT exposure was associated with decreased risk (HRs) for:
    • Lung cancer: 0.748 (P<.001 and>
    • Disease-specific mortality: 0.666 (P<.001 for both>
  • These decreases were not seen among never-smokers.
  • Current HRT users had decreased risk (HRs) for:
    • Lung cancer: 0.842 (P=.007); and
    • Disease-specific mortality: 0.800 (P=.004), respectively.
  • Former HRT users did not have these decreased risks.

Limitations

  • Retrospective study.