IBD: surveillance tied to reduced CRC risk, mortality

  • Am J Gastroenterology

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Colonoscopic surveillance in patients with IBD is associated with a 42% reduction in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, a higher rate of early-stage CRC diagnosis, and a 64% decrease in CRC-related death.

Why this matters

  • The last meta-analysis of colonoscopic surveillance in IBD was conducted more than a decade ago, and found no association between surveillance and reduced CRC mortality.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis of 5 studies with 7199 patients with ulcerative colitis or colonic Crohn’s disease.
  • Funding: Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Disease Group.

Key results

  • Patients who did not undergo surveillance had a higher rate of CRC than those who did (3.2% vs 1.8%; (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.42-0.80).
  • Patients who underwent surveillance had significantly lower CRC mortality (8.5% vs 22.3%; OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.19-0.69) and higher rates of early-stage CRC detection (15.5% vs 7.7%; OR, 5.40; 95% CI, 1.51-19.30).
  • Surveillance was associated with a lower risk for colectomy (36.3% vs 53.7%; OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.27-0.88), but that only included 1 study.

Limitations

  • No randomized clinical trials were included.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit