IBD tied to almost 2-fold increased risk for Parkinson's diagnosis

  • Park S & al.
  • J Clin Med
  • 8 Aug 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Patients with IBD are almost twice as likely as those without IBD to be diagnosed with Parkinson's disease (PD).
  • Treatment with corticosteroids or anti-TNF agents appears to cut this risk.

Why this matters

  • Although the reason for this association is unknown, patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) should be aware of the potential risk for comorbid PD.

Study design

  • Researchers analysed the health records of patients with CD (n=12,631) or UC (n=26,230; total cohort mean age, 39.91±16.62 years; 61.2% men), comparing them with those of age- and sex-matched control patients.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • PD risk for patients with IBD was significantly higher, even when adjusted for health care use: adjusted [a]HR, 1.87 (P<.001>
  • PD risk was particularly high with CD: aHR, 2.23 (P=.023). 
  • With UC, risk was increased but not as steeply: aHR, 1.85 (P<.001>
  • Patients with CD were less likely to develop PD when treated with corticosteroids: aHR, 0.08 (P<.001>
  • No patients with IBD treated with anti-TNF agents (n=2110) experienced PD during 9950 person-years.

Limitations

  • Patients were participants in the South Korean universal health insurance system; findings may not apply to other populations.
  • Data on genetic risk factors for PD were not available.

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