IBS symptoms improve on a starch- and sucrose-reduced diet

  • Nilholm C & al.
  • Nutrients
  • 5 Jun 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Among patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a starch- and sucrose-reduced diet (SSRD) leads to rapid symptomatic improvement.

Why this matters

  • Many patients with IBS do not respond to the usual dietary suggestions, such as a low FODMAPs (fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols) diet.
  • IBS has been linked to higher prevalence of pathogenic sucrase-isomaltase gene variants.
  • SSRD was developed to treat congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency.

Study design

  • Randomized 2-week trial (n=105).
  • Adults with symptomatic IBS were randomly assigned to SSRD (avoiding sucrose and reducing refined cereal intake) vs usual diet.
  • Outcomes: changes in IBS-symptom severity scale (IBS-SSS), visual analog scale for IBS (VAS-IBS).
  • Funding: Swedish nonprofits.

Key results

  • SSRD group’s improved outcomes after intervention vs baseline (all P<.001 ibs-sss vas-ibs abdominal pain diarrhea constipation bloating and flatulence psychological well-being.>
  • Above outcomes did not change vs baseline in the usual-diet group.
  • SSRD vs usual-diet group, >50% reduction in IBS-SSS score: 31.1% vs 0% (P<.001>
  • Reduced cereal intake correlated significantly with lower IBS-SSS and less abdominal pain and diarrhea.
  • Reduced sweets/soft drinks intake correlated significantly with lower IBS-SSS and less abdominal pain, diarrhea, bloating, and flatulence.
  • Improvement noted within 2-3 days.

Limitations

  • Small, brief trial.
  • All participants were Northern European.