Implanted glucose sensor improves glycemic control in T1D

  • Irace C & al.
  • Diabetes Obes Metab
  • 9 Feb 2020

  • curated by Miriam Tucker
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Real-world use of the implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system Eversense for 180 days was associated with significant improvements in glycemic control among adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D).

Why this matters

  • CGM use in T1D is increasing, but device-related issues including insertion difficulty, discomfort, need for frequent changes, and skin irritation represent barriers for some.

Study design

  • Prospective observational study of 100 adult first-time Eversense users with T1D at 7 Italian diabetes-care centers.
  • Time in range (TIR) defined as glucose 70-180 mg/dL.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Overall HbA1c declined from mean baseline 7.4% (57 mmol/mol) to 6.9% (52 mmol/mol) at 180 days (mean change, −0.43% [5 mmol/mol]; P<.0001>
  • The greatest HbA1c reductions occurred in CGM-naive patients and those using insulin pumps (−0.74% [8 mmol/mol]) or multiple daily injections (−0.53% [5 mmol/mol]).
  • Overall mean TIR improved from 63% to 69% (P<.0001 with greatest improvements in the cgm-naive.>
  • Similar improvements observed for time above range and mean glucose, but no difference in time below range.
  • 2 adverse events occurred: mild incision site infection and sensor removal difficulty.
  • Mean sensor duration was 163 days.

Limitations

  • No control group.
  • Only 1 180-day cycle studied.
  • Relatively low baseline HbA1c.
  • Small numbers in some subgroups.
  • QoL not surveyed.