Inpatient opioid treatment for IBD is linked to postdischarge exposure

  • Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol
  • 27 Dec 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Inpatient opioid treatment is associated with postdischarge opioid exposure in patients with IBD.

Why this matters

  • Providers should consider alternative analgesics for patients hospitalized with IBD to reduce risk for future opioid use.

Study design

  • Researchers analyzed the health records of adult patients hospitalized for IBD (N=601), using multivariable mixed-effect logistic regression to assess associations between inpatient opioid exposure and subsequent opioid prescriptions (OPIRx) ≤12 months after discharge.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Inpatient treatment with intravenous opioids (IVOPIs) vs non-IVOPIs had a significantly greater association with OPIRx: OR, 3.3 (95% CI, 1.7-6.4).
  • Inpatient treatment with non-IVOPIs vs no opioids also had a significantly greater association with OPIRx: OR, 4.2 (95% CI, 1.0-16.8).
  • Subgroup analysis of patients with IBD flares (n=621) treated with IVOPIs vs non-IVOPIs showed a significantly greater association with OPIRx: OR, 5.4 (95% CI, 2.6-11.0).

Limitations

  • The study was retrospective and was limited by potential confounding by indication.
  • Patient data did not include dose calculations from inpatient opioid infusions or patient-controlled analgesia.