Interpregnancy weight gain and loss affects future pregnancy outcomes

  • BMJ Open

  • curated by Elisabeth Aron, MD, MPH, FACOG
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Interpregnancy weight change affects pregnancy outcomes.

Why this matters

  • Interpregnancy weight change and the difference in BMI between the first and second pregnancy may predict risk for pregnancy complications.
  • Women with BMI >30 kg/m2 at postpartum visits may benefit from being referred for advice on weight-loss interventions.

Key results

  • A decrease of >1 BMI unit was associated with a 33% reduction in large for gestational age (LGA) births (aOR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55-0.90).
  • An increase in BMI was associated with a higher risk for LGA births (aOR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.29-1.59).
  • An increase in BMI was associated with higher risk for cesarean delivery (CD) (aOR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.06-1.26).
  • A decrease in interpregnancy BMI was associated with a reduced risk for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (aOR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.62-1.03).
  • A decrease in interpregnancy BMI was associated with an increased risk for small for gestational age (SGA) births (aOR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.06-1.63).

Study design

  • Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational and cohort studies (11 studies; n=925,065 women).
  • Outcomes included LGA, SGA, macrosomia, CD, and GDM.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Limitations

  • Heterogeneity of studies may make it difficult to draw conclusions.
  • Limited generalizability.

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