Intervention program reduces asthma symptoms in African-American women

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Takeaway

  • African-American women with asthma who participated in an intervention program reported better asthma control and significant decreases in daytime symptoms and asthma-related hospitalization.

Why this matters

  • African-American women have the highest mortality rate from asthma of all sex and racial groups.

Study design

  • 422 African-American women with asthma randomly assigned to control group (n=212) or a telephone-based intervention program (6 sessions) based on Women Breath Free (n=210).
  • 2-y follow-up.
  • Funding: National Institutes of Health.

Key results

  • Overall mean age was 42.6 y; 44% had annual household income <$20,000; and 32% had college education or higher.
  • Overall mean number of years living with asthma 17.8 y and 30% reported asthmas was not well-controlled.
  • Compared with control group, women who completed all 6 intervention sessions reported significant decreases in daytime symptoms (P<.01) and asthma-related hospitalization (P<.05), better asthma control (P<.001), and were more likely to notice asthma changes during menstrual cycle (P<.001) and during premenstrual cycle (P<.001) at 2-y follow-up.
  • Compared with control group, women who completed full intervention also had significant improvement in self-regulation of their asthma (P<.01) at 2-y follow-up.

Limitations

  • All Southeast Michigan cohort.