Is central obesity linked to tooth loss?

  • Kang J & al.
  • J Clin Periodontol
  • 21 Feb 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Medical News
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According to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology, central obesity in non-obese people is significantly associated with tooth loss.

Researchers at the University of Leeds investigated the association between central obesity and tooth loss in a non-obese population of 19,436 participants aged 19-74 years with body mass index (BMI) 18.5-29.9 kg/m2 from the NHANES 1999-2012. They measured tooth loss by the number of teeth missing. The 3-level categorised waist circumference (normal, high and very high) in combination with 2-level BMI (normal-weight, 18.5≤BMI≤24.9 kg/m2 and overweight, 25 ≤BMI≤29.9 kg/m2) was used to define central obesity.

The results showed that an overweight person with central obesity had a 31% higher risk for tooth loss than a person with similar BMI but no central obesity (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.31; 95% CI, 1.20-1.44), and the prevalence of tooth loss increased by 40% (PR,1.40; 95% CI, 1.26-1.56) if compared with a normal-weight person without central obesity.

The authors said, “Given the evidence of the significant association between central obesity and tooth loss in non-obese population, clinicians should consider non-obese individuals with central obesity in oral health preventive strategies.”

 

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