Is hypogonadism screening important after successful HCV treatment?

  • Chaudhury CS & al.
  • Clin Infect Dis
  • 2 Feb 2019

  • curated by Craig Hicks
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Biochemical hypogonadism, defined by low free testosterone (FT), is common in men who achieve sustained virologic response (SVR) after successful HCV treatment.

Why this matters

  • With this persistence of hypogonadism after successful viral treatment, enhanced awareness and potential screening are needed for this growing population, say researchers.

Study design

  • Investigators in this observational study evaluated the prevalence of low testosterone in men with chronic HCV infection (N=327; mean age, 57±7 years; HIV coinfection=150) and in a longitudinal subset of men with known pre- and posttreatment testosterone levels (n=85).
  • Median follow-up: 36 months.
  • Funding: NIH.

Key results

  • Patients with active HCV at baseline had higher total testosterone (TT; P<.0001 and sex hormone-binding globulin p than patients who achieved svr but ft was the same between groups.>
  • Low TT (
  • TT and SHBG decreased significantly (P<.0001 after svr in the longitudinal cohort whereas ft remained unchanged.>
  • Low FT persisted after SVR (pretreatment, 58%; post-SVR, 54%; P=.72).

Limitations

  • Study data represent biochemical rather than clinically diagnosed hypogonadism.