Is late evening eating linked to diabetes risk?

  • Faerch K & al.
  • Diabet Med
  • 21 Mar 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Medical News
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A new study published in the journal Diabetic Medicine found no association between the timing of last eating episode (TLEE) and 5-year risk for development of prediabetes or diabetes. However, explorative analyses suggested that late evening food intake increases the 5-year risk of developing prediabetes or diabetes among women with good glycaemic control.

Researchers included 2642 men and women (mean age, 60.2 years) from Whitehall II study who were free of diabetes or prediabetes and participated in a 5-year follow-up examination in 2007-2009. They assessed TLEE before the examination day at baseline and investigated the association between TLEE with 5-year changes in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and prediabetes or diabetes risk.

Results showed association of TLEE with change in HbA1c but with little effect size [β per 1-hour increase in TLEE, 0.2 mmol/mol; 95% CI, -0.0 to 0.3 [0.01%; -0.00 to 0.03]; P=.055). No association was seen between TLEE and risk of developing prediabetes/diabetes (risk ratio per 1-hour increase in TLEE, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.94-1.13; P=.511). The 5-year risk of developing prediabetes/diabetes was 1.51 times (95% CI, 1.16-1.93) higher in women with HbA1c ≤36 mmol/mol (

The authors call for randomised controlled trials to check whether restricting late evening food consumption is effective and feasible for type 2 diabetes prevention.