IVF: small increased risk for some rare childhood cancers

  • JAMA Pediatr

  • International Clinical Digest
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • In vitro fertilization (IVF) showed a small association with overall childhood cancer in a large US cohort study.
  • Increased risk for rare embryonal cancers is not clearly attributable to IVF and may be related to underlying infertility.

Why this matters

  • 1.7% of US births result from IVF.
  • IVF is associated with increased risk for preterm birth, lower birth weight, and structural birth defects.

Key results

  • Cancer risk was slightly higher in children born following IVF compared with the non-IVF group: HR, 1.17 (95% CI, 1.00-1.36).  
  • Highest cancer risk associated with IVF was for hepatic cancer: HR, 2.46 (95% CI, 1.29-4.70).

Study design

  • Observational cohort study.
  • Cohort taken from the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinical Outcomes Reporting System (SART CORS), data from more than 91% of all IVF cycles in the United States.
  • Incidence of childhood cancer in IVF and non-IVF groups compared.
  • Funding: National Cancer Institute; NIH.

Limitations

  • Did not look at risk for cancer in subfertile women; increased cancer rate may result from fertility-related issues and not IVF itself.
  • Unmeasured confounders possible.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit