Kenyan and Senegalese doctors seen as effectively using UBT rather than surgical intervention for the management of uncontrolled PPH


  • Conference reports - RSi Communications
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According to a team of physicians from Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and other institutions in the U.S., Kenya, and Senegal, after training doctors in the latter two nations are effectively using uterine balloon tamponade (UBT) rather than surgical intervention for the management of uncontrolled postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). 

Their study, presented at FIGO, held in October in Vancouver, constituted their report on all doctors from healthcare facilities in Kenya and Senegal who had received condom catheter UBT training developed by Massachusetts General Hospital in collaboration with the Ministry of Health of Kenya and Kisumu Medical Education Trust, and who had implemented UBT subsequent to training. 

Thirty of the thirty-one doctors who received UBT training in Kenya and Senegal and subsequently implemented UBT were interviewed for the study. The majority of providers (86.7%) responded that if they had not received UBT training, they would have performed hysterectomy in the cases of uncontrolled PPH that they instead managed with UBT. Only two providers reported a patient requiring hysterectomy after placement of UBT. All doctors responded that they believed that UBT prevented women from being taken to surgery in cases of severe PPH, and all doctors reported that they would continue to use UBT in future cases of PPH. 

The doctors interviewed consisted of a total of 20 Kenyan and 10 Senegalese doctors, of whom 10 were attending doctors, seven were Ob/Gyn residents, and 13 were medical officers.