Kidney donor regret less likely with good health, positive attitude

  • Liu KL & al.
  • Transplant Proc
  • 1 Dec 2018

  • curated by Craig Hicks
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Good physical health and a positive attitude contribute to how patients view the decision to donate a kidney.
  • Men are more likely to have regrets.

Why this matters

  • Clinicians should regularly assess the mood and health of living kidney donors, say researchers, and encourage health-promoting activities, especially for men.

Study design

  • Researchers studied living kidney donors (n=41; mean age, 49.78 [range, 23-69] years; 61% women), using a structured questionnaire to collect data on patient affect, health, and decision-making.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Statistical analysis showed that regret about the decision to donate varied significantly based on:
    • Donor sex (male vs female): z score, −2.439 (P=.015);
    • Physical condition: Spearman correlation (ρ), −0.323 (P=.039);
    • Positive affect: ρ, −0.353 (P=.024); and
    • Effective decision-making: ρ, 0.685 (P<.001>
  • Among living kidney donors:
    • 97.6% agreed donating a kidney was the correct decision;
    • 95.1% would make the same decision again; 
    • 92.7% believed kidney donation was a wise choice;
    • 2.4% regretted the decision to donate; and
    • 4.8% believed that donating harmed them.

Limitations

  • The study was single-center and cross-sectional and had a small sample size.
  • Patients were from Taiwan; results may not apply to other populations.

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