Kids with conduct disorder, depression more likely to play choking game

  • Pediatrics

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Clinical Essentials
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Middle school students with conduct disorder were more than 3 times as likely, and those with depression were nearly 3 times more likely, to participate in the choking game (CG) as those with no symptoms.

Why this matters

  • CG involves self-strangulation or strangulation by another person to achieve a brief euphoric state from cerebral hypoxia, caused by restricted oxygen flow to the brain.
  • These findings add to the growing body of literature suggesting CG may be used as a coping mechanism for depression in adolescents.

Study design

  • Study of merged data from 2 cross-sectional studies realized in 2009 (n=746) and 2013 (n=1025) among French middle school students.
  • Funding: No external funding.

Key results

  • The lifetime prevalence of CG participation was 9.7% with no differences between boys and girls (P=.701).
  • At the time of the study, 17.9% of students practiced ≥1 risky sport and 26.3% displayed current high-risk vehicle use.
  • Significant predictors of CG participation were:
    • Highest depressive symptoms (OR, 2.79; P<.001>
    • Highest conduct disorder symptoms (OR, 3.37; P<.001>

Limitations

  • Cross-sectional study design.
  • Small sample size.

Coauthored with Antara Ghosh, PhD 

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit