Kisspeptin holds potential for treating psychosexual disorders in men

  • Yang L & al.
  • JCI Insight
  • 13 Feb 2020

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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New research has found that injecting the hormone kisspeptin could enhance brain activity associated with attraction in men. 

Kisspeptin, a naturally occurring hormone is believed to stimulate the release of other reproductive hormones. The study exploring the potential of kisspeptin for the treatment of common psychosexual disorders in men was published in the journal JCI Insight.

In a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted at the Hammersmith Hospital in London, 33 healthy men aged 18-34 years were administered an infusion of kisspeptin or placebo. The participants were then asked to view female faces and to sniff a female perfume (Chanel No. 5) associated with sexual arousal. During these tasks, the researchers performed MRI scans of their brains to determine responses to the perfume and faces.

The findings showed that kisspeptin enhanced attraction pathways in the brain in response to the female fragrance and faces, compared with placebo. Furthermore, it was found that on viewing female faces, kisspeptin demonstrated a greater effect on attraction pathways in men with lower sexual quality of life.

Professor Waljit Dhillo, one of the study authors at the Imperial College London, said: "Attraction is usually the first step to sexual arousal and it’s encouraging to see that kisspeptin can also boost brain activity relating to this."