Living in deprived conditions ups the risk for depression in men

  • Remes O & al.
  • BMJ Open
  • 25 Nov 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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A new study published in BMJ Open suggests that British men residing in most deprived areas have a higher risk for major depressive disorder (MDD).

Researchers conducted a population-based cohort study which included 20,919 British adults. The sample was controlled for key confounders such as social class, medical history and disability. MDD and socio-demographics were determined through a structured Health and Life Experiences Questionnaire, and deprivation was measured using census data.

After adjusting for confounders, men residing in the most deprived areas had a 51 per cent higher risk for MDD than those living in non-deprived areas (OR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.01-2.24; P=.043). However, there was no statistically significant association between deprivation and MDD in women (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.93-1.65; P=.143) in the adjusted model. Furthermore, men residing in areas with high levels of unemployment had an almost 80 per cent higher likelihood of developing depression than those living in areas with low levels of unemployment.

The authors commented: "The genders seem to be differentially affected by the environment, and we believe it is important to highlight this for policy-makers, clinicians and public health authorities."