Long-term outcomes of lung transplant with ex vivo lung perfusion


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
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The lung donor pool could be increased by assessing and reconditioning high-risk donor lungs with ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP), according to the findings of a new study.

The retrospective cohort single-centre study included 230 patients receiving donor lungs undergoing EVLP (EVLP group) and 706 patients in a non-EVLP group.

EVLP group donors had significantly lower mean PaO2:fraction of inspired oxygen ratio and also had higher prevalence of abnormal chest radiography results and higher proportion of smoking history. More recipients in the EVLP group received single-lung transplants.

There was no significant difference in time to chronic lung allograft dysfunction between the EVLP and non-EVLP groups (70% vs 72% at 3 years; 56% vs 56% at 5 years; and 53% vs 36% at 9 years; log-rank P=.68).

No significant difference was found for allograft survival between the groups (73% vs 72% at 3 years; 62% vs 58% at 5 years; and 50% vs 44% at 9 years; log-rank P=.97).

All secondary outcomes, including maximum predicted percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), acute cellular rejection and de novo donor-specific antibody development, were similar between the two groups.

The research is published in JAMA Surgery.