Long-term outcomes with CBT for IBS

  • Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol

  • curated by Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Medical News
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New results from the Assessing Cognitive behavioural Therapy for IBS (ACTIB) trial suggest cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can deliver long-term benefits for patients with refractory irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

The randomised controlled ACTIB trial has previously shown that at 12 months, therapist-delivered telephone CBT and web-based CBT with minimal therapist support significantly reduced IBS symptoms compared with treatment as usual (TAU) in adults with refractory disease.

Now, the new results published in the Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology show that the benefits last for at least 24 months.

At 24 months, mean IBS Symptom Severity Score (IBS-SSS) was 40.5 points (95% CI, 15.0-66.0; P=.002) lower in the telephone-CBT group and 12.9 points (95% CI, −12.9 to 38.8; P=.33) lower in the web-CBT group than in the TAU group.

The mean and Work and Social Adjustment Scale score was 3.1 points (95% CI, 1.3-4.9; P<.001 lower in the telephone-cbt group and points ci p=".036)" web-cbt than tau group.>

A clinically significant IBS-SSS change (≥50 points) from baseline to 24 months was found in 84 (71%) of 119 participants in the telephone-CBT group, 62 (63%) of 99 in the web-CBT group and 48 (46%) of 105 in the TAU group.

The authors say increasing access to CBT for IBS could achieve long-term patient benefit.